Slave Ship

August 24, 2018 at 6:00 pm (Reads) (, , )

slaveSlave Ship by K.W. Jeter

—–

After being so disappointed with the first book in this series, I went into the second book with lowered expectations. It helped at the start — it felt like it was a little bit better — but by the first third of the book, it felt like I was reading the first book all over again. It wasn’t engaging, and I felt myself lucky if I were reading twenty pages a day.

Like the first book, Slave Ship flips between two timelines, one during the events of The Empire Strikes Back, the rest about halfway into the events of Return of the Jedi. This time, I at least recognized that Jeter was using a framing device by having Dengar telling Neelah what happened in the past. I don’t remember that being the structure in the first novel, but as long as it took to get through it, and as hard as it was for me to pay attention to it, I could have just missed it.

Also, by this book, the Bounty Hunters Guild has been disbanded, which was news to me. Did it happen in the first book and I just missed it? (I’m willing to admit this is likely the case.) Or is it like the Clone Wars and it happened between entries in the series? Now, don’t think that you won’t know this is the case, though; Jeter tells us over and over again that it’s been disbanded, thanks to Boba Fett. It’s sort of like “With great power comes great responsibility” in Spider-Man: You’re going to hear it again and again and again.

Jeter still has some cool, cyberpunky ideas, which are rarely seen in the Expanded Universe, so I think it’s refreshing to see them here, but he doesn’t do much with those ideas. His characters are flat, the plot seems forced, and he uses a lot of info-dumps. His action scenes are also flat, and since there are a few battles that take place, that’s unfortunate.

Speaking of characters, that of Boba Fett feels off. I know he’s supposed to be a ruthless character, but Jeter makes him this emotionless, manipulative character who doesn’t quite gel with how I perceive him from the movies. Ruthless is one thing, but sociopathic is a little different. Plus, we never get any of Fett’s point of view, so we never know what his motivations are. I’m sure that’s intentional — Fett has always been a mysterious character — but as much as he’s featured on the covers and summaries of the books, I expected a bit more attention paid to his character.

So, I’m going to finish the series (I’ve come this far, and I’ve already committed to reading all the EU books, for good or ill), but the second book hasn’t given me any reason to change my mind on its quality. I’m tempted to just read the Wookieepedia entry for the third book so I can jump ahead, but I’m a slave to my projects. I won’t expect it will change my mind about the series, though.

Started: August 9, 2018
Finished: August 21, 2018

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: