Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher

May 10, 2018 at 6:00 pm (Reads) (, , )

sixSix Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher by Richard P. Feynman

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About twenty years ago, I read Feynman’s two memoirs based on a co-worker’s recommendation. He led an interesting life, enough so that even when he came across as self-serving, it was still hard to resist his anecdotes. Since I’ve started listening to science audiobooks, I figured it would serve me well to listen to some of Feynman’s lectures. Six Easy Pieces seemed like the place to start.

On the one hand, the best way to absorb these lectures is by listening to them. You get to hear Feynman himself, complete with his sense of humor and somewhat irreverent approach to science, and you can hear the sound of the chalk when he sketches something on the blackboard. On the other hand, you discover that Feynman was a very fast talker, and you don’t get to see the sketches he makes on the blackboard. It doesn’t help that the first lecture had deteriorated so much by the time they produced the audiobook that digital recovery was almost impossible, making the audio muddy and difficult to hear.

It’s also interesting to discover just how Feynman sounded. He was articulate and knowledgeable, of course, but he also had a thick New York accent that belies his appearance and background. I think I’m too used to folks like Carl Sagan and Neil DeGrasse Tyson, people who have worked to develop a public personality as well as a scientific background, to expect that to be how Feynman sounded. I don’t want to say it detracts from the subject matter, but I did get pulled out of the lecture whenever I heard him say “yuman”.

Along with Cosmos and A Brief History of Time, Six Easy Pieces is a classic of scientific literature. It doesn’t delve as deeply into some concepts covered in those books, but since these lectures were from a Physics 101 class, it’s hard to fault Feynman for not going into more detail. Given in 1961, the lectures are dated in some ways, but what makes this book important is seeing how Feynman taught these difficult subjects. He taught them without complexity, giving examples that were easy to understand. Hearing excerpts from those lessons tells us a lot about science and about Feynman himself.

Started: March 12, 2018
Finished: March 15, 2018

1 Comment

  1. agogo22 said,

    Reblogged this on msamba.

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