Phoebe and Her Unicorn in the Magic Storm

January 9, 2018 at 6:00 pm (Reads) (, , )

unicornPhoebe and Her Unicorn in the Magic Storm by Dana Simpson

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I discovered the comic strip Phoebe and Her Unicorn over two years ago. It’s fantastic. It’s about a precocious young girl who befriends a unicorn, and how they become best friends. It’s about a lot more than that (friendship, diversity, acceptance, and family), but the relationship between Phoebe and Marigold Heavenly Nostrils (no kidding) is the real draw. There’s a sincerity and maturity about the strip that reminds me of Calvin & Hobbes, but with much less snark.

The Magic Storm is the sixth book featuring the characters, but the first five were collections of the strips. I don’t usually record or review those, since there’s not as much narrative structure to a strip (save for the few extended storylines), but this book is the first self-contained, extended story featuring Phoebe and Marigold. It also features the other main characters (Phoebe’s parents, her friend Max, and her frenemy Dakota), as well as introducing a couple of new characters. It’s probably not the best place to start with the strip, since the background between Phoebe and Dakota is better developed through the strip, but all that means is you get to read the first five books. (Trust me: This is a Good Thing™.)

The story opens with Marigold sensing something strange about her magic, while at the same time Phoebe is receiving severe weather alerts on her phone. The two, of course, are related, and it takes the two of them working together with their friends and the goblins to determine the source of the problem. It’s peppered with the lighthearted humor of the strips, and shows the positivity of the relationships of the characters. There’s a particular feel to the strip, and Simpson has captured that same feel here.

The Magic Storm isn’t the most tightly plotted story, but it’s intended for younger kids, and the lessons of the story are important ones. Given the choice between strip collections or self-contained stories, I would likely choose the strip collections, but if Simpson wants to keep telling these tales, I will keep reading them. Any chance to revisit the charm of her characters is one to take.

Started: October 18, 2017
Finished: October 18, 2017

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