Wolverine

December 29, 2017 at 6:00 pm (Reads) (, , )

wolverineWolverine by Chris Claremont & Frank Miller

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I came into comics too late to read Wolverine right off the shelf, but man, did I know about it. It was a grail title of mine, since I loved Wolverine’s character, but it was always too expensive for me to buy to read. At some point, I wound up with the first issue, but I never got any further than that with the story. That first issue starts out strong, though, with an opening line as iconic as “The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed”: “I’m the best there is at what I do, but what I do best isn’t very nice.”

From there, we follow Logan hunting a bear that’s been left for dead, but has instead gone on its own killing rampage. He finds the bear, kills it, and expresses remorse over the act since it had been driven to it; then, he tracks down the man who poisoned it but didn’t kill it, fights him, and sends him to jail without any regrets. It sets the tone of his character, and shows him being more animal than man. In short, it defines all that is Wolverine.

Then, it moves to Japan. Mariko is Logan’s love, back in Japan and not accepting or sending letters. He goes to Japan to track her down, and becomes enmeshed in some crime drama related to Mariko’s new husband. That’s the point where the story goes off the rails and stops making sense. The Hand is involved, but it’s hard to tell what’s driving the crime gangs, and what their business actually is. For the story, Claremont only makes it clear that they’re criminals, and organized. I guess he feels like this is all we need to know.

What we do need to know, apparently, is Logan’s backstory. We get it at the start of each issue. In four or five panels on one page, we get his name, hear about his mutant healing abilities, his adamantium-laced skeleton, and his claws. Even at the time of the title’s publication, people knew who Wolverine was, and he was already a fan-favorite. Readers didn’t need it reiterated with every issue, but that’s what we get.

Released back in 1982, Wolverine is a comic that shows its age. At its time, it might have been a little progressive; it seems like Claremont did some research into Japanese culture instead of just populating the story with offensive stererotypes, and having a female assassin might have bucked some trends at the time. Thirty-five years later, the culturalism comes across as stereotypical, and the female characters are little more than story-dressing. Mariko doesn’t have any depth outside of her being a daughter, or Logan’s love, and the assassin, Yuriko, is inconsistent. During a fight, she’s cut by a sword, and Logan notes that she doesn’t make a sound, because she’s tough like that; later, she’s threatened by a crime boss, who grabs and twists her wrist, and she cries out, saying, “You’re hurting me!” That she falls in and out of a relationship with Logan only reinforces that inconsistency.

I hadn’t known Frank Miller had done the art in this book until I started reading it, and it’s sufficient. It feels kinetic, and isn’t done in such a way that things aren’t clear (in fact, there’s a scene where, mid-fight, Logan pulls an arrow from his arm to use against another assassin, and it’s done subtly enough that it’s not obvious, nor does it fade into the background), but parts of it made me laugh. Every time Logan snikts his claws, each one has to gleam in the light, and there were times when his mouth would be wide open in a yell (the better to show off those animalistic canines, my dear), only to be saying one word, quietly. The artwork didn’t always match the mood of the story.

I’ll freely admit my expectations were too high for Wolverine, but man, did it let me down. It’s too much a product of its time to hold up well so many years later.

Started: September 28, 2017
Finished: September 28, 2017

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